Result

2022

Svea Bank and Resurs Bank receive remarks for insufficient credit assessments

Svea Ekonomi, which has now merged with Svea Bank, and Resurs Bank have been deficient in their credit assessments of consumers who received large unsecured loans. Both banks are therefore receiving a remark and an administrative fine of SEK 45 million and SEK 50 million, respectively.

Nordnet receives a remark and an administrative fine

Finansinspektionen (FI) is issuing Nordnet Bank AB a remark for violations related to the bank's intraday short selling service. Nordnet must also pay an administrative fine of SEK 100 million.

Are banks refusing to open payment accounts for too many customers?

Are banks correct in refusing to open accounts for certain consumers? And what role do credit intermediaries play in many consumers taking large unsecured loans? These are two of the issues that Finansinspektionen (FI) will look more closely at in 2022 and that we present in this year's Consumer Protection Report.

Many households are sensitive to higher interest rates

New mortgagors took out loans that were 12 per cent larger last year than in 2020. The average loan-to-value ratio for new mortgagors rose from 307 to 327 per cent. This is the highest figure since FI started its mortgage survey. The stricter amortisation requirement has slowed rising loan-to-income ratios. The high debt means that borrowers’ personal finances are under more pressure when interest rates rise.

2021

Continued problems with credit assessments of consumer credits

Borrowers of consumer credits have higher incomes and pay less for their loans in relation to their income compared to previous years. But we are seeing deficiencies in the credit assessment, and many borrowers are still receiving collection notices. Young borrowers are still overrepresented among those that experience early repayment problems. These are the conclusions from this year’s consumer credit survey.

New guidelines regarding consumer credit assessments

Many consumer credit assessments need to improve to fulfil the requirements of the Consumer Credit Act. Finansinspektionen (FI) is therefore now clarifying what information lenders should gather for a credit assessment and how this information should be used. The new general guidelines will go into effect on 1 November 2021.

Mortgages must be amortised again

The rules on amortisation go into effect as normal again after 31 August. The temporary exemption that Finansinspektionen (FI) introduced due to the exceptional uncertainty in the economy during the spring of 2020 is now ending. This means that households with high loan-to-value and debt-to-income ratios must amortise their mortgages.

New borrowers are taking larger mortgages

New borrowers are continuing to take larger mortgages in relation to their income and the value of their home, according to this year’s Swedish Mortgage Market, which is being presented today by Finansinspektionen (FI). FI also announces in the report that the temporary exemption from the amortisation requirement will end on 31 August.

Young adults and low-income earners face greatest risk of debt trap

Young borrowers and borrowers with low income run a higher risk of experiencing payment problems when they take non-mortgage loans, even if they only borrow small amounts. At the same time, the risk that consumers will get trapped in debt decreases if credit providers conduct thorough credit assessments. These are the conclusions of a new analysis from Finansinspektionen that is presented in conjunction with this year’s consumer protection report.

FI’s prioritised areas for 2021

Are the banks conducting thorough credit assessments when customers apply for consumer credit? Are smaller banks and payment service firms taking sufficient measures to prevent money laundering? What risks will the coronavirus pandemic pose in the future? These are three areas that Finansinspektionen (FI) will look more closely at in 2021.

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